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«October 2015»

Data Warehouse from the Ground Up at SQL Saturday Orlando, FL on Oct. 10th

SQL Saturday #442SQL Saturday #442 is upon us and yours truly will be presenting in Orlando, Florida on October 10th alongside Mitchell Pearson (b|t). The session is scheduled at 10:35 AM and will last until 11:35 AM. I’m very excited to be presenting at SQL Saturday Orlando this year as it’ll be my first presenting this session in person and my first time speaking at SQL Saturday Orlando! If you haven’t registered yet for this event, you need to do that. This event will be top notch!

My session is called Designing a Data Warehouse from the Ground Up. What if you could approach any business process in your organization and quickly design an effective and optimal dimensional model using a standardized step-by-step method? In this session I’ll discuss the steps required to design a unified dimensional model that is optimized for reporting and follows widely accepted best practices. We’ll also discuss how the design of our dimensional model affects a SQL Server Analysis Services solution and how the choices we make during the data warehouse design phase can make or break our SSAS cubes. You may remember that I did this session a while back for Pragmatic Works via webinar. I’ll be doing the same session at SQL Saturday Orlando but on-prem! ;)

So get signed up for this event now! It’s only 11 days away!

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Create Date Dimension with Fiscal and Time

Here are three scripts that create and Date and Time Dimension and can add the fiscal columns too. First run the Dim Date script first to create the DimDate table. Make sure you change the start date and end date on the script to your preference. Then run the add Fiscal Dates scripts to add the fiscal columns. Make sure you alter the Fiscal script to set the date offset amount. The comments in the script will help you with this.

This zip file contains three SQL scripts.

Create Dim Date

Create Dim Time

Add Fiscal Dates

These will create a Date Dimension table and allow you to run the add fiscal script to add the fiscal columns if you desire. The Create Dim Time will create a time dimension with every second of the day for those that need actual time analysis of your data.

Make sure you set the start date and end date in the create dim date script. Set the dateoffset in the fiscal script.

Download the script here:


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SSIS: Assign a value to Variable using Dataflow Script task

  • 19 September 2010
  • Author: PatrickLeBlanc
  • Number of views: 74903

I am not quite sure how many of you have tried to set or change the value of a variable using an SSIS script task, but if you have tried I am sure that you may have ran into a few road blocks.  Recently I tried to do this and I quickly realized that it is not as straightforward as I thought.  To do this configure your package so that you have a source of some type on the data flow design surface.  Drag a script task onto the data flow and connect it to the source.  Typically, you would set the variable you want to read from or write to as a ReadOnly or ReadWrite value on the Custom Properties of the script task.


This is only the case on the Control Flow.  In the case of the data flow this is not required.  I don't claim to be a developer, but I do know how to use the Internet to find a solution to a problem.  After searching for about 10 minutes I found three posts that assisted me in solving the problem.  Each post provided a little snippet of code that added to my solution.  Here is the code:

   1:      public override void Input0_ProcessInputRow(Input0Buffer Row)
   2:      {
   4:          IDTSVariables100 vars = null;
   5:          VariableDispenser.LockOneForWrite("intMaxSalesDetailsID", ref vars);
   6:          if(!Row.SalesDetailID_IsNull)
   7:              vars[0].Value = Row.SalesDetailID;
   8:          vars.Unlock();
   9:      }


On line 4 declare an interface that is going to allow us to access the variable.  In the next line we lock the variable for writing.  In line six ensure that the value that is being assigned to the variable from the Input Row is not null.  Then on the next line set the value of the variable to the desired column from the buffer.  Lastly, unlock the variable.  That's all to it.  If you have other method, preferably a simpler approach, send me an email at or post it here.

Talk to you soon,

Patrick LeBlanc, SQL Server MVP, MCTS

Founder and

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