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Power BI Publish to Web for Anonymous Access is Here

Earlier this week on Wednesday the Microsoft Power BI made an incredibly exciting announcement and released Power BI “publish to web” as a preview feature. This is HUUUUGE news! This was probably the top requested feature and its finally here thanks to the hard work and dedication of the Microsoft Power BI team!

Read Getting Started with R Visuals in Power BI

Power BI “publish to web” allows you to easily expose a Power BI report to the world through an iframe that can be embedded wherever you like.

To publish your Power BI report to the web, log into your Power BI site.

Find the report that you want to share and click File in the top left.
Power BI publish to web

You’ll see a message pop up box similar to below. Click the yellow button to create the embed code.
Power BI publish to web preview

This is where you’ll see a very important warning!
WARNING: Reports that you expose through the “publish to web” feature will be visible to everyone on the internet! This means NO AUTHENTICATION is required to view the report that is embedded in your application.
warning 2

Once you do that, you’ll receive an embed code that you can then use to expose your Power BI report within your blog as seen below!

https://msit.powerbi.com/view?r=eyJrIjoiYTNjNzcwNjctNTczMy00ZDMxLWFlMGUtMDViODA1NGZiNmI0IiwidCI6IjcyZjk4OGJmLTg2ZjEtNDFhZi05MWFiLTJkN2NkMDExZGI0NyIsImMiOjV9

As you can see the report maintains all the interactivity features of Power BI. And as your Power BI report updates and changes, those changes will be reflected in your embedded Power BI reports!

Pretty awesome!

Additional Resources

Read the Power BI “publish to web” announcement here.

Read the Power BI “publish to web” documentation here.

Feedback

Let me know what you think of this feature or if you have any questions. Leave a comment down below.


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MDX NON EMPTY KEYWORD VS NONEMPTY FUNCTION

Non Empty vs NonEmpty

Hey everyone, in this blog I want to address a very common MDX Question. What is the difference between the NON EMPTY keyword and NONEMPTY function? To take it a step further which one should you use?

Non Empty keyword VS NONEMPTY Function.

The big difference between the NON EMPTY keyword and the NONEMPTY function is when the evaluation occurs in the MDX. The NON EMPTY keyword is the last thing that is evaluated, in other words after all axes have been evaluated then the NON EMPTY keyword is executed to remove any empty space from the final result set. The NONEMPTY function is evaluated when the specific axis is evaluated.

Should I use NON EMPTY keyword or NONEMPTY function?

Ok Mitchell, so you told me when each of these are evaluated but really you haven’t told me anything up until this point. Can you tell me which one I should use already? Well, unfortunately, it depends. Let’s walk through an example of each using the BOTTOMCOUNT function.

BOTTOMCOUNT FUNCTION with NON EMPTY Keyword

In this example I’m returning the bottom ten selling products for internet sales. Notice that I have returned all products that have no internet sales, this is not necessarily a bad thing, maybe you want to return products that don’t have sales.

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However if you don’t want to return these products then we can try using the NON EMPTY keyword. In the below example you can see the results when I add NON EMPTY to the ROWS axis.

image

WHOOOAAA, what happened?? A lot of people would have expected the results here to show the bottom ten products that DID have sales. However, that is not the case, remember that I said the NON EMPTY keyword is evaluated LAST after all axes have been evaluated. This means that first the bottom ten selling products which have $0 in sales are first returned and then the NON EMPTY keyword removes all that empty space from the final result.

BOTTOMCOUNT function with NONEMPTY function.

So let’s try this again, if you want to return the bottom ten products that had sales then we must first remove the empty space before using the BottomCount function. Take a look at the code below:

image

In this code we first remove the empty space before using the BOTTOMCOUNT function. The result is we return the bottom ten products that had internet sales. Once again neither one is right or wrong here it just depends on what you want in your final result.

NON EMPTY Keyword vs. NONEMPTY Function – Performance

There is a very common misconception that the NONEM

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View Getting Started with Power BI and Time Calculations with Dustin Ryan is Now Available!

Earlier today I had the please of speaking with the PASS Business Intelligence Virtual Chapter on getting started with Power BI and time calculations! There were a bit of audio issues on my end but thankfully we were able to still have a great event with lots of great questions!

If you missed the webinar, have no fear! You can still watch the recording right here. Just jump ahead to minute 11 as I had some unfortunate connection issues!

If you have any additional questions or feedback, please leave a comment down below.

Additional Resources

Download my PowerPoint slide deck here.

The PASS BI VC is a great group with tons of free, quality training events! I highly recommend you connect with this group so you can stay up to date on all their great events!

The PASS BI VC also has all their previous webinar recordings hosted on YouTube so definitely check that out!

If you’re new to Power BI, I suggest you start here.

Read more about Getting Started with R Visuals in Power BI

Read more about 10 DAX Calculations for your Tabular or Power Pivot Model (Part 1)

Read more about 10 DAX Calculations for your Tabular or Power Pivot Model (Part 2)

Feedback

I hope you enjoyed the webinar and that you maybe even learned a little something. If you have any questions, comments, or feedback, please leave it down below! Thanks for reading and watching!


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Choosing the Right Microsoft Reporting Technology Part 3: PowerPivot

  • 2 May 2012
  • Author: DevinKnight
  • Number of views: 9546
  • 0 Comments

Today I’ll be continuing in a blog series designed to help you decide which presentation tool is best for your reporting needs.  So far I’ve discussed in previous posts:

You learned how these two tools are almost opposites of each other.  Reporting Services is generally thought of as a static reporting tool, while Excel is usually used for ad-hoc reporting.  The products still left to cover are:

  • PowerPivot
  • PerformancePoint
  • Power View

Part three of the series will focus on PowerPivot.

PowerPivot

What it is

PowerPivot is much more powerful than any of the other reporting tools that will be discuss in this series because it does much more than just product reports.  While it does have the ability to create some impressive reports it really cannot create any addition visualization that regular Excel PivotTables can't already do.

image

The real impressive part about PowerPivot is the modeling part of it.  With PowerPivot you actually design a modeling layer that brings in the different objects that you choose.  I purposely use the word objects generically here because you can import any data source that you can think of into PowerPivot.  Whether you need to bring in a table from SQL Server, a flat file or even something from DB2 it can all be done very easily with PowerPivot.  In fact, even if I needed to bring in all three of those objects into the same PowerPivot document and relate them to each other that is possible too.  Within the tool you have the ability to create logical relationships that may not exist on the source systems.  The view below shows how the new PowerPivot 2012 has improved the way relationships are designed.  Previously designing these relationships was done through a single dialog box instead of the new graphic diagram view shown here.

image

PowerPivot uses a fairly new in-memory technology called xVelocity (formally called Vertipaq) to handle all of the report processing requests.  With xVelocity Excel is able to process hundreds of millions of rows with amazing response times from a desktop machine. The xVelocity engine uses in-memory column-oriented storage and a highly compression data storage to produced the results you see today. 

Another key thing to understand about PowerPivot is that the data pulled into PowerPivot is actually stored in the document an import is performed.  That allows it to use the store engine described earlier.  The one problem with this is that the data is static until manual update is kicked off.  When the update is run all of the data in the PowerPivot document is reloaded backed back in file.  Unfortunately, there is not incremental update yet so if you have a significantly large data source it may take a while update.  Later when I discuss how PowerPivot can be consumed I’ll talk about how SharePoint can assist in automating this data refresh process.  SharePoint is really the true way to scale out PowerPivot so other users can utilize the reports you build.

What it isn’t

One worry that many IT staffers feel about PowerPivot is that power users will begin creating these documents and making decisions off of them while10 other users have created simpler but different documents and get different results.  If you see something like this happening in your environment, which is completely possible, you could create a full Analysis Services solution (either tabular or multidimensional) to replace the PowerPivot documents to ensure all these users a consuming a single source for their reports. 

It is also important to note that PowerPivot is not a replacement for any ETL that performs data cleansing or applies business rules.  Most data warehouses have a set of ETL processes that perform these tasks and that way all users are looking at the same data set.  PowerPivot does not eliminate the need for this.

Who Uses it

The goal is to have power users the driving force behind the creation of PowerPivot documents.  This would be a person that understands the source database(s), business needs, understands the concept database relationships and understands Excel all fairly well.

While that may be the goal for who should be using PowerPivot that is not what I actually see happening in the field.  I am still seeing most PowerPivot implementations being completely controlled by IT. 

Over the last year I have seen this start to change so it does become more user driven but I think the problem that is preventing more users from getting their hands on the tool is education.  A lot of clients that I visit either don’t know what PowerPivot is or if they do they’ve never be taught (even in a simple demo) how it works.  So until this changes we may see a lot of PowerPivot solutions started in IT.

How is it consumed

The two ways PowerPivot can be consumed is the either directly through Excel or through SharePoint.  PowerPivot documents that are used directly through Excel rely completely on the machines resources they are viewed from.  So for example if I create and use a PowerPivot document on my laptop then it use all the resources of my laptop for importing data and processing results.  If I wanted others to see this report using this method I would have to either place the file on a shared drive or email it to those I want to view it.  That sounds terrible!

The best way to scale PowerPivot so that it is usable by a larger number of users is to setup SharePoint integration.  When PowerPivot for SharePoint is installed any reports viewed from a PowerPivot Gallery (SharePoint library for PowerPivot) run using a special Analysis Services instance to do all report processing rather than your laptops resources as previously described.  You may have noticed going through the SQL Server 2008 R2 install that there is an option to install SQL Server PowerPivot for SharePoint.  Using this SharePoint integration not only allows you to using Analysis Services for report processing but also allows you to schedule data refreshes, which is a huge help because normally data refreshes are a manual process without SharePoint.

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Limitations

The major known limitations with PowerPivot are experienced when SharePoint is not part of the solution.  All of these have been detailed previously but as a reminder:

  • Refreshing report data in PowerPivot is a manual process
  • PowerPivot uses the resources of the machine the file is on
  • Sharing a PowerPivot reports can be difficult for large documents (shared drive or email)

PowerPivot for SharePoint of course addresses each of these limitations.  One other limitation that I have not detailed yet is working on 64 bit vs 32 bit PowerPivot.  I highly recommend if you use PowerPivot that you only do it with the 64 bit version.  You will find out very quickly when you begin importing data sources into you document that without 64 bit the process can be slow and painful.  You might even run into some limitations with the amount of data it will import on a 32 bit instance.  With 64 bit PowerPivot the sky is the limits though!

Summary

As we go through this series remember these high level characteristics about PowerPivot:

  • For power users that can understand a little modeling and relationships
  • Can bring in multiple unrelated data source together for reporting
  • SharePoint is the right way to make PowerPivot scalable

I hope you’ve found this helpful and stay tuned for the Part 3 in this series on PerformancePoint. To read any of the other parts to this series follow the links below.

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DevinKnight

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