Business Intelligence Blogs

View blogs by industry experts on topics such as SSAS, SSIS, SSRS, Power BI, Performance Tuning, Azure, Big Data and much more! You can also sign up to post your own business intelligence blog.

«February 2016»
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
25262728293031
12345

Power BI Publish to Web for Anonymous Access is Here

Earlier this week on Wednesday the Microsoft Power BI made an incredibly exciting announcement and released Power BI “publish to web” as a preview feature. This is HUUUUGE news! This was probably the top requested feature and its finally here thanks to the hard work and dedication of the Microsoft Power BI team!

Read Getting Started with R Visuals in Power BI

Power BI “publish to web” allows you to easily expose a Power BI report to the world through an iframe that can be embedded wherever you like.

To publish your Power BI report to the web, log into your Power BI site.

Find the report that you want to share and click File in the top left.
Power BI publish to web

You’ll see a message pop up box similar to below. Click the yellow button to create the embed code.
Power BI publish to web preview

This is where you’ll see a very important warning!
WARNING: Reports that you expose through the “publish to web” feature will be visible to everyone on the internet! This means NO AUTHENTICATION is required to view the report that is embedded in your application.
warning 2

Once you do that, you’ll receive an embed code that you can then use to expose your Power BI report within your blog as seen below!

https://msit.powerbi.com/view?r=eyJrIjoiYTNjNzcwNjctNTczMy00ZDMxLWFlMGUtMDViODA1NGZiNmI0IiwidCI6IjcyZjk4OGJmLTg2ZjEtNDFhZi05MWFiLTJkN2NkMDExZGI0NyIsImMiOjV9

As you can see the report maintains all the interactivity features of Power BI. And as your Power BI report updates and changes, those changes will be reflected in your embedded Power BI reports!

Pretty awesome!

Additional Resources

Read the Power BI “publish to web” announcement here.

Read the Power BI “publish to web” documentation here.

Feedback

Let me know what you think of this feature or if you have any questions. Leave a comment down below.


Read more
67
8

MDX NON EMPTY KEYWORD VS NONEMPTY FUNCTION

Non Empty vs NonEmpty

Hey everyone, in this blog I want to address a very common MDX Question. What is the difference between the NON EMPTY keyword and NONEMPTY function? To take it a step further which one should you use?

Non Empty keyword VS NONEMPTY Function.

The big difference between the NON EMPTY keyword and the NONEMPTY function is when the evaluation occurs in the MDX. The NON EMPTY keyword is the last thing that is evaluated, in other words after all axes have been evaluated then the NON EMPTY keyword is executed to remove any empty space from the final result set. The NONEMPTY function is evaluated when the specific axis is evaluated.

Should I use NON EMPTY keyword or NONEMPTY function?

Ok Mitchell, so you told me when each of these are evaluated but really you haven’t told me anything up until this point. Can you tell me which one I should use already? Well, unfortunately, it depends. Let’s walk through an example of each using the BOTTOMCOUNT function.

BOTTOMCOUNT FUNCTION with NON EMPTY Keyword

In this example I’m returning the bottom ten selling products for internet sales. Notice that I have returned all products that have no internet sales, this is not necessarily a bad thing, maybe you want to return products that don’t have sales.

image

However if you don’t want to return these products then we can try using the NON EMPTY keyword. In the below example you can see the results when I add NON EMPTY to the ROWS axis.

image

WHOOOAAA, what happened?? A lot of people would have expected the results here to show the bottom ten products that DID have sales. However, that is not the case, remember that I said the NON EMPTY keyword is evaluated LAST after all axes have been evaluated. This means that first the bottom ten selling products which have $0 in sales are first returned and then the NON EMPTY keyword removes all that empty space from the final result.

BOTTOMCOUNT function with NONEMPTY function.

So let’s try this again, if you want to return the bottom ten products that had sales then we must first remove the empty space before using the BottomCount function. Take a look at the code below:

image

In this code we first remove the empty space before using the BOTTOMCOUNT function. The result is we return the bottom ten products that had internet sales. Once again neither one is right or wrong here it just depends on what you want in your final result.

NON EMPTY Keyword vs. NONEMPTY Function – Performance

There is a very common misconception that the NONEM

Read more
9

View Getting Started with Power BI and Time Calculations with Dustin Ryan is Now Available!

Earlier today I had the please of speaking with the PASS Business Intelligence Virtual Chapter on getting started with Power BI and time calculations! There were a bit of audio issues on my end but thankfully we were able to still have a great event with lots of great questions!

If you missed the webinar, have no fear! You can still watch the recording right here. Just jump ahead to minute 11 as I had some unfortunate connection issues!

If you have any additional questions or feedback, please leave a comment down below.

Additional Resources

Download my PowerPoint slide deck here.

The PASS BI VC is a great group with tons of free, quality training events! I highly recommend you connect with this group so you can stay up to date on all their great events!

The PASS BI VC also has all their previous webinar recordings hosted on YouTube so definitely check that out!

If you’re new to Power BI, I suggest you start here.

Read more about Getting Started with R Visuals in Power BI

Read more about 10 DAX Calculations for your Tabular or Power Pivot Model (Part 1)

Read more about 10 DAX Calculations for your Tabular or Power Pivot Model (Part 2)

Feedback

I hope you enjoyed the webinar and that you maybe even learned a little something. If you have any questions, comments, or feedback, please leave it down below! Thanks for reading and watching!


Read more
1011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29123456

Choosing the Right Microsoft Reporting Technology Part 1: Report Services

  • 2 May 2012
  • Author: DevinKnight
  • Number of views: 6429
  • 0 Comments

As Business Intelligence has evolved over the years the number of tools we have to choose from for presenting data has advanced drastically.  With so many tools to choose from it can be rather confusing (especially when your company is just getting their feet wet in BI) to determine which tool is the right one for an organizations reporting needs.  Just within the Microsoft suite of tools (not including third-party tools) you have Reporting Services, Excel, PowerPivot, PerformancePoint and Power View.

Many companies try to marry themselves to one or two reporting tools and fit their needs into the restrictions of the tool(s) they have chosen.  The truth is not a single one of these tools can solve all reporting needs.  While each one of these tools by themselves may be able to present your data, you will find that using a combination approach will conclude in a much more well rounded and impressive reporting solution. 

That’s why in this blog series I hope to demystify the decision process and educate you a little bit on each of the tools so that you can easily determine which tool would be best in different scenarios.  Like I mentioned earlier the Microsoft reporting tools we will cover will be:

  • Reporting Services
  • Excel (From the perspective of building PivotTables without PowerPivot)
  • PowerPivot
  • PerformancePoint
  • Power View (Yes Power View is supposed to be
    considered part of Reporting Services in SQL Server 2012, but it really
    is an entirely different tool than SSRS is traditionally thought of as)

After discussing each of the tools each individually I’ve bring it all together by showing you how to use a decision matrix to determine which tool makes sense for your work examples. 

Reporting Services

What it is

Reporting Services is traditionally used for developing static reports.  The word static here is referring to the report layout rather than the report data (obviously the data will change).  For example, I want my sales team to be able to review a line item detail of each of their sales from the prior day.  With Reporting Services I could have the sales team either log onto a web front end to view a live version of the report or I could have the report emailed to them daily.

image 

The reports developed with the tool are highly customizable.  In fact just about any object of the report can be manually changed or made dynamic with the expression language it uses. 

If you’re looking for a tool for creating dashboards then Reporting Services also has the capability of filling that need.  With charts, gauges, indicators, sparklines and maps you have many of the necessary tools for creating an impressive dashboard.  There are other tools that like PerformancePoint that can create more impressive interactive dashboards but Reporting Services can get the job done.

Reporting Services is also highly scalable.  Without much effort the workload for report processing can be shared across multiple instances of reporting services.  After installing multiple instances the native wizard guides you through creating a farm of report servers.

Another thing worth noting because it will not be true of all the other tools I discuss in this series is that it can connect to virtually any data source you have.

What it isn’t

While there are some parts of Reporting Services that can provide ad hoc reporting capabilities the core of the tool is for static reporting.  If you really have a need for ad hoc reporting and could care less about report layout than you would likely pick another tool like Excel.

Who Uses it

While Reporting Services does have functionality for a power user to create their own reports it is typically thought of as a developers tool.  So report developers would use the tool Business Intelligence Development Studio (BIDS), which is part of the SQL Server install) to create incredibly detailed reports with almost endless flexibility when it comes the visualizations. 

The tool that power users can use for creating reports is called Report Builder.  It has almost all the same functionality as BIDS but has been simplified a little for end users with more wizards and easier ways to bring in datasets.  Because it has a lot of the same functionality of the developers too you will find that this tool is for highly technical end user.

How is it consumed

Like I mentioned earlier Reporting Services reports can be consumed through a web front end of the native Report Manager, SharePoint, or even embedded in a custom application you’ve written with the Report Viewer control. 

In addition to viewing the reports from a web browser they can also be delivered directly to the users via email or in a shared folder that they can access.  This is done using an incredibly useful part of the tool call Subscriptions.

Limitations

Again, Reporting Services is a static reporting tool therefore if your users find the need to change report layout frequently than that may eliminate this tool as an option for that particular report.

Another limitation you may run into is some of the functionality with Subscriptions, the report delivery tool mentioned earlier, are enterprise only features.  For example, if you wanted to make the reports delivered dynamic based off a list of emails you have in the database that must be done using Data Driven Subscriptions, which are Enterprise only.

Summary

As we go through this series remember these high level characteristics about Reporting Services:

  • For static report development
  • Extremely customizable
  • Dashboard capable
  • Highly scalable
  • Traditionally thought of as a developers tool
  • Has a native web front end but can also view reports through SharePoint and direct delivery with subscriptions

I hope you’ve found this helpful and stay tuned for the Part 2 in this series on Excel. To read any of the other parts to this series follow the links below.

Print
Tags:
Rate this article:
No rating
DevinKnight

DevinKnightDevinKnight

Other posts by DevinKnight

Please login or register to post comments.